Welcome to the Rhinebeck Community Garden

We are a community garden sponsored by the Town of Rhinebeck located behind the Starr Library in the Village of Rhinebeck.

Our garden contains 32 plots that are individually maintained plus two shared plots for our local food pantry.

AUGUST 6, 2011 COMMUNITY GARDEN WORK DETAIL AND POT LUCK

Follow this link to some photos of the day’s event.  http://gallery.me.com/gspeed#100256

This is a map of our garden:


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Growing Tips

Germinating Very Fine Seeds, Such as Carrots
Saturate a thick layer of newspaper. Separate and spread the seeds out in a thin layer on the newspaper. After several days the seeds will have germinated and will be easier to handle and plant individually in peat pots or directly into the soil.

The Rhinebeck Community Garden has opening for the members of the Rhinebeck community to join the garden.  For $25 which covers the growing season, members receive a plot (15′ x 20′) or half plot (15′ x 10′) and are provided with compost, mulch and water.  Members are responsible for maintaining their own plot and commit to using organic substances and natural pesticides and keeping their plot planted, weeded and looking good.  In addition to time spent with their own plot, members commit to 12-15 additional hours (a few each month) over the course of the growing season for “group work”.  Pot lucks at the garden are held monthly, as well.  The Garden is located in back of the Starr Library in Rhinebeck, across the parking lot from the municipal pool.  Come meet the gardeners this Saturday during their first group work detail (9 a.m. – 12 noon or 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.) or for the pot luck from noon until 1 p.m.

Check out our blog:  http://rhinebeck-gardens.com/2011/07/28/welcome-to-the-rhinebeck-community-garden/

For more information about joining the garden and for an application, please contact our Membership Chair, Jill Welch, at rhinebeckcommunitygarden@gmail.com or by calling 845.594.1394.

Apple Cake

Apple Cake, very old recipe

Favorite

2 cup granulated sugar

½ cup unsalted butter, softened

2 eggs, room temperature

5 cups apples, room temperature, pared and diced

1/2 cup walnuts, chopped

2 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon cinnamon

1 teaspoon nutmeg, freshly grated

2 cups flour

Preheat oven to 350 degrees, grease a 9” x 13” pan lightly with butter, line the bottom of the pan with parchment paper, grease parchment and sides of pan lightly with butter.

In an electric mixer, cream butter and sugar, add eggs and mix well.  Stir in apples, nuts and vanilla and mix well.

Measure dry ingredients into a bowl and whisk together.  Add to batter and mix well.

Spoon batter into pan and bake in preheated oven for about 45 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Borscht (Russian Beet Soup)

From Aunt Ruth.  Favorite.  From Brooklyn via Paris.  Tastes even better the day after!

4-5 pounds beef bones

2 tablespoons pickling spice

1-2 bay leaves

1 – 1 ¾ pounds cabbage

3-5 medium beets, about 1 ½ pounds

¾ pound baby beet tops, chopped

28 ounces peeled, canned tomatoes

2 onions, huge, cubed on large side

2 tablespoons white vinegar

3 tablespoons fresh minced dill (optional)

Beef stock:

Add beef bones to 4-5 quart stock pot and enough cold water to cover bones by 3-4 inches. Wrap pickling spice and bay leaf in cheesecloth and tie up; add this bouquet garni to pot.   Slowly bring to a gentle boil.  Skim surface.  Gently simmer for about 2 hours.  After broth is made, remove bones, discard spices, skim fat and add rest of the ingredients.

While stock is simmering, prepare vegetables.

When stock is done, add:

Shredded or finely sliced cabbage

Cubed beets

Baby beet tops

Canned tomatoes (Muir Glen are preferable)

Onions

Vinegar and dill

The vinegar stops the beets from bleeding.

Simmer for about 2 hours.  Serve with a big dollop of sour cream in the middle of individual soup bowls.

This recipe is shared by Karen Kochis from epicurious.com.  Its easy, yummy and a great way to use the zucchini that are now so plentiful.

Zucchini Keftedes with Feta and Dill

1 1/3 pounds medium zucchini, trimmed

1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt

1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions

3 tablespoons chopped fresh dill

3 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel

1 cup panko (japanese breadcrumbs)

1 large egg, beaten to blend

1 cup coarsely crumbled feta cheese

Canola oil (for frying)

Plain whole-milk or reduced-fat Greek-style yogurt (for garnish)

Additional chopped fresh dill (for garnish)

Ingredient info: Panko is available in the Asian foods section of most supermarkets and at Asian markets.

Greek-style yogurt is a thick yogurt that’s sold at some supermarkets and at specialty foods stores.

Grate zucchini on large holes of box grater onto clean kitchen towel. Sprinkle zucchini with 1 teaspoon coarse salt; let stand at least 30 minutes and up to 1 hour. 

Line rimmed baking sheet with parchment or foil. Wrap zucchini in towel; squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Place zucchini in medium bowl. Mix in green onions, 3 tablespoons chopped dill, mint,

garlic, lemon peel, and 1/2 teaspoon black pepper. Gently stir in panko and egg, then feta. Using 2 tablespoons zucchini mixture for each, shape mixture into 1 3/4- to 2-inch-diameter patty; place on baking sheet. Chill at least 1 hour. DO AHEAD: can be made 4 hours ahead. Keep chilled. 

Pour enough canola oil into heavy large skillet to reach depth of 1/4 inch; heat over medium-high heat. Working in batches, add patties to skillet. Cook until golden and cooked through, adjusting heat

if browning too quickly, 3 to 4 minutes per side. Using slotted metal spoon, transfer to paper towels. 

Arrange keftedes on platter. Top each with dollop of yogurt. Sprinkle each with dill. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Bon Appétit

April 2011

by Michael Symon

2011-03-15 17:37:02.0

Massaged Kale Salad

Here is a recipe for all that tasty kale in your garden plot.  The kale is not cooked in this recipe.  This is an amazing recipe where that old adage applies:  the whole is greater than the sum of it’s parts.

Massaged Kale Salad

1 bunch kale (black kale is especially good), stalks removed and discarded, leaves thinly sliced
1 lemon, juiced
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling
kosher salt
2 teaspoons honey
freshly ground black pepper
1 mango, diced small (about 1 cup)
small handful of toasted pumpkin seeds, about 2 rounded tablespoons

Directions;
In large serving bowl, add the kale, half of lemon juice, a drizzle of oil and a little kosher salt. Massage until the kale starts to soften and wilt, 2 to 3 minutes. Set aside while you make the dressing.

In a small bowl, whisk remaining lemon juice with the honey and lots of freshly ground black pepper. Stream in the ¼ cup of oil while whisking until a dressing forms, and you like how it tastes.

Pour the dressing over the kale, and add the mango and pumpkin seeds. Toss and serve.

From Food Network, Aarti Sequeira, 2010

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